The Right Way to Apply to Marketing Positions

Applying to Marketing PositionsAs a growing inbound marketing agency, we maintain an open pipeline for marketing roles. We're fortunate to have many candidates apply for our listed positions. Since we've seen a good volume of folks apply, we figured we'd discuss some useful tips as they relate to applying for any marketing position. 

Cover Letters Still Matter

Cover letters may seem old fashioned, but they still matter in an online world. We use Jazz for applicant tracking. When an applicant applies, we receive an email and can quickly see if a cover letter was submitted. For me, a cover letter identifies a bit of extra effort in the application process. If you include something specific to LyntonWeb it's even better. Ultimately, agencies are in the relationship business. We seek ongoing relationships with our clients by customizing solutions for them and bringing them regular value. A cover letter lets me know an applicant is interested in initiating a relationship with LyntonWeb. Even if you're not applying to an agency, you still should use a cover letter to differentiate yourself to the job screener or hiring manager. Use it to start building a relationship with your potential colleagues and bosses. 

Human Networks Still Matter 

It's easy to apply to positions online. But don't start to believe you've accomplished anything by applying to a position solely online. That's false progress in a job search. You have no idea if a human is even monitoring the applications or if the position has already been filled, or the timeline of filling the position. 

If you know someone at a company you would like to work for call them, quickly. Call them before you apply to that company online. A real conversation will help you figure out how 'real' the advertised position is and how soon it's going to be filled. Ask your contact to set up a call with the hiring manager if possible. You're trying to build a real relationship and position yourself above any online applicants. Your goal should be to hand deliver a resume to a human. 

Metrics Still Matter

It's great that you have worked in HubSpot or Salesforce but that's just a start. What specifically have you done? Have you managed 20K per month retainers and guided them to a 50% lift in visits or leads over the course of a year? Those are the sort of metrics that help you stand out among other applicants. Quantify your benefit to your current company to highlight how you can benefit a future company. It's really not about you. It's about the value you can bring to a new employer. Think of yourself as a professional football player. They are measured by their stats and production. Baseline skills are already assumed. 

Finally, remember to paint a real picture of yourself. You are not just a job. You're a person, with interests and passions outside of work. Use a resume to show your purpose. And show an employer how your purpose ties into everything you've done. If you can do that, you'll probably get the job. 

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