The Friday Five - Dr. Seuss, Noise, and Google Blows Up Email Marketing

lw_friday_five_holiday_season

Hello inbound nation! It's time for The Friday Five: Five Headlines from Social Media, Inbound Marketing, SEO, and Web Design, our weekly roundup for ideas and news that you can use. And here they are:

  1. 3 Ways the Magic of Dr. Seuss Can Help You Create Unforgettable Copy
  2. Your Biggest Competition Is Noise
  3. Message Received: Instagram Matches Snapchat And Twitter In Letting You Chat
  4. The Next Domain Gold Rush: What You Need to Know
  5. Gmail blows up e-mail marketing by caching all images on Google servers

3 Ways the Magic of Dr. Seuss Can Help You Create Unforgettable Copy - copyblogger

Follow these three scientific (and magical) techniques used by the king of addictive prose: Dr. Seuss.

Your Biggest Competition Is Noise - MarketingProfs

The greatest need isn’t to add to the noise. It’s to distill to a simple, compelling, and memorable signal. By developing micro-statements and using analogies, you can gain memory space and beat your biggest competition: noise.

Message Received: Instagram Matches Snapchat And Twitter In Letting You Chat - readwrite

With the addition of private messages, two-way communication on the platform could increase, thus expanding Facebook’s clutches on our text-based messages.

The Next Domain Gold Rush: What You Need to Know  - Moz

ICANN had more than 1,900 applications for TLDs, and of those Name.com currently lists 544 that will be available for sale in the near future. This is an unprecedented explosion in available domain names, and you can expect a gold rush mentality as companies scoop up domains to protect trademarks and chase new opportunities and as individuals register a wide variety of vanity domains. So, when do these domains go on sale, and how much will they cost? 

Gmail blows up e-mail marketing by caching all images on Google servers - ars technica

But Google has just announced a move that will shut most of these tactics down: it will cache all images for Gmail users. Embedded images will now be saved by Google, and the e-mail content will be modified to display those images from Google's cache, instead of from a third-party server. E-mail marketers will no longer be able to get any information from images—they will see a single request from Google, which will then be used to send the image out to all Gmail users.

That's what we've got. How about you inbound marketing friend? 

Guide to Hiring a Web Design Agency

You Might Also Like